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Monthly Archives: April 2017

Some Amazing Effects of Photography

Panning

Panning is a photography technique that is mostly used to shoot moving objects such as sports cars, race competitions. It involves the horizontal, rotational and vertical movement of an image or video. To achieve best results of a sharp subject with a blurred background, you need to stay with an object as you frame and press the shutter button. It is among the old techniques, so it needs a lot of practice and patience to master.

Thirds rule

It is a method that is frequently used by artists and painters. Work produced using the technique can be found in art galleries. The rule of thirds method involves breaking down the photo in thirds, vertically and horizontally to have nine parts. The focus object is usually not placed in the middle which results to it being interesting, moving and dynamic. Factors to consider are the point of interest and the frame. Mentally divide your viewfinder into three to frame the shot.

Golden hour

Also referred to as the magic hour, it is the first hour of sunrise and last time of the sunset. The light is of different quality thus add quality and interest to the photo. It requires one to be fast for the quality of light fades quickly

Fill flash

This technique involves filling the dark areas of an image using flash. The background of the picture is usually brighter than the subject. A photographer needs to adjust the shutter and aperture speed to expose the background. The circumstances when to use flash are:

• When foreground light is less than in the background

• When close to the focus subject

Long exposure

It is an effect that creates a dreamy landscape, it both captures still elements and moving. Objects in motion usually are blurred. The photographer narrows the aperture and sets the shutter to a long duration speed.

Cleaning Camera for Better Performance

Cleaning the lens

The camera lens is one of the most important parts of the camera, but it is not that hard to clean. You simply need to take off end and front caps and use a soft lens cleaning brush to get rid of sand and large particles present. The brush should be very soft, so it does not scratch the lens. Using lens wipes and lens cleaning fluid you can then wipe clean the glass. The lens tissues are non-abrasive and will not scratch the glass. You can then use a dry wipe to dry up any residue.

Cleaning the sensor

It is more sensitive compared to the lens and should be handled with care. If you have the right camera cleaning kit, then you might just manage to do a good job with the cleaning, but if you are not very sure then it would be wiser to have a professional do the cleaning for you. You will need a disposable sensor swab and a sensor cleaning solution. The swab should be just the right size of the sensor and only a few drops of the cleaning solution should be used. Soak the swab just to the tip ensuring that there are no risks of dripping or pooling the sensor. Wipe the sensor from side to the other with only one fluid motion, but you can re-swab if it does not clean effectively.

Cleaning the body

Regular cleaning of the body keeps dirt from creeping to the sensor and lens. Use cotton swabs and soft cloths dampened with rubbing alcohol or water to clean the body. The soft cloth will give you an easy time with flat body parts and the grip whereas the cotton swabs will allow access in hard to reach areas like diopter, switches and knobs.

Photography White Balance

Different light sources will add a different color cast to your images even though to the naked eye they appear ‘normal’. Fluorescent lighting is actually blue in color, tungsten bulbs add yellow.

The naked eye and the brain behind it are smart enough to discern these differences and therefore to us a white paper is a white paper… is a white paper!

The ‘brain’ in your camera is not quite that smart and won’t normalize the range of color temperatures that we can.

The White Balance settings in your camera are here to help as this can have a tremendous impact on the quality of the images that you take as you can take control of your camera and tell it to ‘warm up the image’ or ‘cool down the image’.

Look up the settings for your individual camera’s white balance mode. You can do this manually or in most cases these days, have preset white balance settings.

Below are some of the basic white balance settings that most cameras will have:

Auto- this is where the camera makes a best guess on a shot by shot basis. You’ll find it works in many situations but it’s worth venturing out of it for trickier lighting.

Tungsten-this setting will generally cool down the colors in your photos.

Fluorescent- this setting will generally warm up the colors in your photos.

Daylight/Sunny- tends to keep the white balance in a kind of ‘neutral’ state.

Cloudy- this setting generally warms things up a touch more than ‘daylight’ mode.

Flash- the flash of a camera can be quite a cool light so in Flash WB mode you’ll find it warms up your shots a touch.

Shade- will warm things up a touch.

Manually adjusting the White Balance

You can actually get pretty decent shots by using the above preset values. You can however, learn how to do this manually.

The basics behind adjusting things manually will remain the same even though the way you do it will vary from camera to camera.

In essence, you will set up a reference point for your camera (what white/grey actually is) and your camera will know that this is white.

You can then manually adjust the warmth factor up or down appropriately dependent on the conditions under which you are shooting!

As with everything else in photography this is one of the basics. Once you actually understand how to warm or cool an image, feel free to go nuts on the settings to get whatever effect you are actually after.

Watermark Your Photos

1. Branding.

Your watermark can be a signature, a small photo or a logo. As such, it serves to brand you. When people look at your images, they learn something about you.

If you consistently show photos that appeal to them, they’ll get to know who you are and look forward to seeing more of what you publish.

Your images may be quotes or landscapes or funny stuff that you share.

2. Promotion.

Watermarks on your photos promote. What do you want viewers to do? Where do you want people to go? What do you want them to see beyond the image?

Answer these questions to determine what kind of watermark you should create.

You may want to promote yourself, your business, a website or blog. Make sure your watermark reflects that.

For example if your business has a logo, choose that for your watermark.

Your signature would be a good choice if you are promoting you,

I chose to create a community on Facebook, and as such, use a logo of its name, which is both personal and business.

If you use social media with its sharing capabilities, your images can potentially be viewed by thousands or million of people. That’s a lot of promotion.

3. Protection.

Certainly if your images go viral on the Internet, you want to protect your brand, so that people cannot simply take your photo and brand it as their own.

Although this latter point isn’t foolproof, because watermarks can ultimately be removed, it has some safety benefit.

In most cases, unless you are a professional photographer, you won’t need to copyright your photos.