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Category Archives: Photography

Some Amazing Effects of Photography

Panning

Panning is a photography technique that is mostly used to shoot moving objects such as sports cars, race competitions. It involves the horizontal, rotational and vertical movement of an image or video. To achieve best results of a sharp subject with a blurred background, you need to stay with an object as you frame and press the shutter button. It is among the old techniques, so it needs a lot of practice and patience to master.

Thirds rule

It is a method that is frequently used by artists and painters. Work produced using the technique can be found in art galleries. The rule of thirds method involves breaking down the photo in thirds, vertically and horizontally to have nine parts. The focus object is usually not placed in the middle which results to it being interesting, moving and dynamic. Factors to consider are the point of interest and the frame. Mentally divide your viewfinder into three to frame the shot.

Golden hour

Also referred to as the magic hour, it is the first hour of sunrise and last time of the sunset. The light is of different quality thus add quality and interest to the photo. It requires one to be fast for the quality of light fades quickly

Fill flash

This technique involves filling the dark areas of an image using flash. The background of the picture is usually brighter than the subject. A photographer needs to adjust the shutter and aperture speed to expose the background. The circumstances when to use flash are:

• When foreground light is less than in the background

• When close to the focus subject

Long exposure

It is an effect that creates a dreamy landscape, it both captures still elements and moving. Objects in motion usually are blurred. The photographer narrows the aperture and sets the shutter to a long duration speed.

Cleaning Camera for Better Performance

Cleaning the lens

The camera lens is one of the most important parts of the camera, but it is not that hard to clean. You simply need to take off end and front caps and use a soft lens cleaning brush to get rid of sand and large particles present. The brush should be very soft, so it does not scratch the lens. Using lens wipes and lens cleaning fluid you can then wipe clean the glass. The lens tissues are non-abrasive and will not scratch the glass. You can then use a dry wipe to dry up any residue.

Cleaning the sensor

It is more sensitive compared to the lens and should be handled with care. If you have the right camera cleaning kit, then you might just manage to do a good job with the cleaning, but if you are not very sure then it would be wiser to have a professional do the cleaning for you. You will need a disposable sensor swab and a sensor cleaning solution. The swab should be just the right size of the sensor and only a few drops of the cleaning solution should be used. Soak the swab just to the tip ensuring that there are no risks of dripping or pooling the sensor. Wipe the sensor from side to the other with only one fluid motion, but you can re-swab if it does not clean effectively.

Cleaning the body

Regular cleaning of the body keeps dirt from creeping to the sensor and lens. Use cotton swabs and soft cloths dampened with rubbing alcohol or water to clean the body. The soft cloth will give you an easy time with flat body parts and the grip whereas the cotton swabs will allow access in hard to reach areas like diopter, switches and knobs.

Photography White Balance

Different light sources will add a different color cast to your images even though to the naked eye they appear ‘normal’. Fluorescent lighting is actually blue in color, tungsten bulbs add yellow.

The naked eye and the brain behind it are smart enough to discern these differences and therefore to us a white paper is a white paper… is a white paper!

The ‘brain’ in your camera is not quite that smart and won’t normalize the range of color temperatures that we can.

The White Balance settings in your camera are here to help as this can have a tremendous impact on the quality of the images that you take as you can take control of your camera and tell it to ‘warm up the image’ or ‘cool down the image’.

Look up the settings for your individual camera’s white balance mode. You can do this manually or in most cases these days, have preset white balance settings.

Below are some of the basic white balance settings that most cameras will have:

Auto- this is where the camera makes a best guess on a shot by shot basis. You’ll find it works in many situations but it’s worth venturing out of it for trickier lighting.

Tungsten-this setting will generally cool down the colors in your photos.

Fluorescent- this setting will generally warm up the colors in your photos.

Daylight/Sunny- tends to keep the white balance in a kind of ‘neutral’ state.

Cloudy- this setting generally warms things up a touch more than ‘daylight’ mode.

Flash- the flash of a camera can be quite a cool light so in Flash WB mode you’ll find it warms up your shots a touch.

Shade- will warm things up a touch.

Manually adjusting the White Balance

You can actually get pretty decent shots by using the above preset values. You can however, learn how to do this manually.

The basics behind adjusting things manually will remain the same even though the way you do it will vary from camera to camera.

In essence, you will set up a reference point for your camera (what white/grey actually is) and your camera will know that this is white.

You can then manually adjust the warmth factor up or down appropriately dependent on the conditions under which you are shooting!

As with everything else in photography this is one of the basics. Once you actually understand how to warm or cool an image, feel free to go nuts on the settings to get whatever effect you are actually after.

Watermark Your Photos

1. Branding.

Your watermark can be a signature, a small photo or a logo. As such, it serves to brand you. When people look at your images, they learn something about you.

If you consistently show photos that appeal to them, they’ll get to know who you are and look forward to seeing more of what you publish.

Your images may be quotes or landscapes or funny stuff that you share.

2. Promotion.

Watermarks on your photos promote. What do you want viewers to do? Where do you want people to go? What do you want them to see beyond the image?

Answer these questions to determine what kind of watermark you should create.

You may want to promote yourself, your business, a website or blog. Make sure your watermark reflects that.

For example if your business has a logo, choose that for your watermark.

Your signature would be a good choice if you are promoting you,

I chose to create a community on Facebook, and as such, use a logo of its name, which is both personal and business.

If you use social media with its sharing capabilities, your images can potentially be viewed by thousands or million of people. That’s a lot of promotion.

3. Protection.

Certainly if your images go viral on the Internet, you want to protect your brand, so that people cannot simply take your photo and brand it as their own.

Although this latter point isn’t foolproof, because watermarks can ultimately be removed, it has some safety benefit.

In most cases, unless you are a professional photographer, you won’t need to copyright your photos.

Highly Effective Photographers

Understand that pressing the shutter is only half of making a good photograph.

Modern cameras are no match for the human eye, and still have lots of limitations, especially in low light situations.

Post-processing has been done since the invention of photography (either in a traditional darkroom or on a computer). This is where you polish your final images, and make adjustments to compensate for the constraints of the camera.

Select and present only the very best images from a photo shoot.

Store a back-up copy of their images onto an external hard drive, or somewhere safe.

Publish photographs, so they aren’t destined to die on a dusty hard drive, unseen by the world.

Share their work to get constructive feedback from peers, (e.g. via on-line galleries such as 500px, Flickr, Google Photos, Instagram or a Facebook group.)

Present their images as a means of self-expression; their contribution to recording the world, from their point of view, (e.g. framed photos, greeting cards, calendars, art galleries, photo-books, or merely as prints inside a simple photo album).

Get inspiration from other photographers they admire.

Read eBooks, magazines, blog posts, look at Facebook posts, or view YouTube videos.

Visit galleries, take workshops or go on a photography tour to learn from a more experienced shooter.

Travel in search of fresh subject matter; this could be interesting locations or photogenic people.

On a micro level, they use their feet to find fresh angles and perspectives – they ‘work the scene’, and don’t just settle on the first composition they see.

On a macro level, they visit exotic or remote locations away from home, opening their eyes to new possibilities.

Avoid shooting clichés, looking for a new ‘take’ on well-photographed subjects.

 

Must Scan Your Old Photographs

  • All photographic materials will deteriorate with time. The rate at which they decay is different for various materials (and storage conditions), but it is happening to all of your photographic memorabilia just the same.
  • Old slides and negatives will tend to color-shift over time. This happens when the film base (which is plastic!) slowly changes with age. The dyes which form the image can also fade – particularly in the case of less-expensive color photographs.
  • As soon as your pictures are digitized, that deterioration is stopped. Perhaps most importantly, the digitized images can, very often, be brought back to their original brilliance with relative ease, if the deterioration has not been too great. In addition, there are now digital storage discs that are expected to last for over 100 years
  • If you have a lot of slides, to view your slides, you have to dig out your old projector (if it still works – tried to find a projector bulb recently?), or a slide viewer, in order to see them.
  • If you have old negatives, you really can’t view them at all – unless you have some rare genetic ability to visually invert colors on your own.
  • Due to an unfortunate technical oversight, the manufacturers of old photo albums neglected to equip them with USB ports (it could have to do with the fact that the technology did not exist). That means, however, that there is no direct way to upload them to your computer. A good scanning service, however, will not only scan the full album pages (which preserves the “flavor” and character of the album), but they can also provide scans of the individual pictures as well – either all of them, or just selected ones if desired.
  • Your past is really important – not just to you, but also to your children, your grandchildren (if any) and other relatives. Your photos represent the best (often, the only) record of that past. By bringing them into digital form them, you can share them with all the important people in your life.
  • Once they are scanned into digital files, your collection old photographs can be shared effortlessly. You can post them to your Facebook pages, and share them on all your favorite social media sites. You can create slide shows, and load them into a digital picture frame so that they are on constant display.
  • Once you upload your photos onto your computer, it turns it into a time machine. Now, all those valued (or, in some cases – forgotten) parts of your history can be pulled up at any time, to be enjoyed and shared.

Biggest Problems With Photo Editing

Indistinct Pictures

Amateur photographers do not understand the unavoidable use of tripods or monopods in dim lights. Therefore, their pictures come out to be blurry or unclear. Blurred photographs can now be made clear and sharp. There are tools which can also aid you to reverse the effect i.e. anonymize a photograph by blurring it.

Removal of the Red Eye

This defect is generic in photos of the people with light eye colour and when they look directly into the flash. This effect of red spot appearing in the eyes can be removed with red eye removal tool.

Temperature Control

It is a trend to get clicked in retro or solar modes. The temperatures could be adjusted with the use of smart editing tools to make your picture look as if it was clicked in early years. You can even set other colour combinations and make it look more attractive. However excessive sharpness will increase the noise; whereas extensive noise reduction will spoil the picture details. Temperature control can be used to retouch an old photograph to make it look as clear as new.

Photo Crop

Some images can include unnecessary background and might serve as a distraction from the main focus. A cropping is performed to remove the additional objects, people, landscapes, etc. At times, cropping is also done to reduce the size of a picture or to focus the subject.

Removal of Dust

Images or shots taken of plain areas might highlight the curds stuck on the sensor of a camera. To clear the spots in the final image, healing brushes are used. This flaw is generally visible if the aperture is small or lesser than f/16.

Contrast Issues or Over Exposed Images

At times, some pictures are taken in excessive bright light or in sharp sunlight and an imbalanced image is produced by a huge difference in highlighted and gloomy areas. Such images have high contrast level as they were overexposed to light. By fine-tuning the coordinates of histograms to the appropriate levels, the contrast of an image can be controlled.

Control the Size

The scaling of an image is performed to make people or objects look small or large by adjusting the pixel digits. With the concept of Thin is In almost all the photographs of models are edited to make them look thinner.

Sensor Gel Stick

First of all, you should get the sensor exposed. Once the whole sensor becomes visible, you should clean the lens with the gel stick. Then you should clean the dust off the gel using the adhesive paper that comes with the gel stick. Remember: don’t make a rush when cleaning the camera. You don’t want to drop the camera accidentally.

You can use the gel several times repeating the process over and over again. Once you are done, you should turn the camera off, install the lens and set the aperture to f/32. Now, take a photo of a white wall or a white piece of paper. If the picture is free of any spots, the lens is clean.

Usually, sensor gel sticks should not be used in a room with a temperature lower than 40F. The ideal temperature is 70F if you want the best performance. Using the product in too low or too high temperatures will not give you the best performance. In worse cases, you may end up reducing the shine of the sensor, which will adversely affect the image quality. Therefore, you may want to check the temperature of the room first.

Since the stickiness of the gel varies based on the coating technologies applied on the sensor filters, we suggest that you don’t use one sensor gel stick for cleaning the lens of different cameras, as one shoe can’t fit everyone.

Normally, the cleaning product can be used on all digital cameras that come with interchangeable lenses. The good news is that most camera manufacturers have cameras that have interchangeable lens.

Some mirrorless cameras feature a coating technology that allows the gel sticks to leave behind some residue on the sensor filter surface. As a result, you will need to clean the sensor thoroughly. You should use the right type of sensor gel stick for cleaning these cameras.

Cameras that don’t come with a mirror are not easy to clean. Therefore, it’s a lot better to go for a camera that can be easily cleaned. A lens that is not clean won’t allow you to take high-quality pictures, as the quality of the pictures depends largely on the clarity of the lens or sensor. Therefore, cleaning the lens with a quality cleaner is highly recommended.

Hire Professionals for Corporate Event Photography

• You have a better business value – While your guests and clients notice professional photographers present at your event, they tend to value you more as it brings about a skilled touch to your work. While you have professional and high quality images of your event for showcasing on your website and brochures, you get to bring about an appeal that is professional.

• Proficient services – While they come along with a set of high quality equipment to capture your event, they would ensure the fact that you do not have to instruct them on anything after an initial briefing. If it is a large event, they would ensure that several photographers in the team would capture the event from different angles.

• Helps in future business prospects – While you have a stock of high-quality images to showcase your clients, you have better chances of business for the days to come. Your employees can use them as references and also helping you bring out a good picture of your company o the world.

• Creates a good memory for your organisation – While you collect photographs from your employees and guests that they have captured during the event, there is a variation in the quality of the photographs that you may not like to preserve. While the photographer captures the best photographs of the moments from your event, you get to have a collection of the best photographs of the same quality that would not only enhance the look of your collection but would look appealing as well.

Become Self Taught Photographer

People say that to become a professional photographer takes at least from five to six years of steady and regular training and development. Market conditions are constantly changing; if a person is ill-versed in it, he has to wade through a lot of difficulties. The fact is that what there was five or six years ago may be no longer applicable today. This also applies to the practical work, and education. Paradoxically, today photographers are not prepared in any educational institution, they start from scratch with the camera and simply do photography depending on practice and taking some theory from I-net. A complete professional education involves the viability of the labor market, a good level of preparation of the photographer, both technical and artistic. So, relying on that, there are some ways of getting knowledge for the future photography career.

PHOTOGRAPHY SCHOOLS

Higher education in photography is available in many institutes of higher education, schools, training, etc. But now, according to professional photographers, this formation does not meet modern requirements. More and more people step aside from the formal education for independent courses or even free I-net lectures.

The problem is not only in the time lack or some global market tendencies, but also in the fact that the individual faculties of photographers, can be a sufficient basis. Also, the overall high demand for entrance exams can become a serious obstacle for the novice photographers. Studying online or in private with the craftsman turns out to be cheaper, more effective, and easy-going.

PRIVATE COURSES

Most private schools, although compared to the public ones having the better technical equipment, have a serious drawback: as a rule, they do not teach mechanic photography basics like chromatic, and chemistry, photo processes and photo composition, or lack separate lessons on photographic technique and lighting. Usually, it is a photographer with a lot of shooting experience, both analog and digital, who does not always practice some photography disciplines. Again, most currently known professional photographers did not receive education themselves. So, anyone who wants to become a professional photographer does so at their own risk. There’s no sure way to become a good photographer just like there’s no universal recipe for becoming an excellent product manager.

Main problem of a professional photographer

The main problem of a professional photographer is that money on taking a photo will always stand in the first place. It’s enough to have a look at a good photographic technique and materials price tag to make sure of it. There’s no work for free, even if you’re an artist. And to sell good, you should follow the market demands, but not your ambitions, want it or not.

Another problem is the need for an art education, which is the kinda paradox. Of course, every new client wants to know if you’re keen on what you do, and your glossy diploma usually serves as a solid proof, if not numerous honorable mentions of respected customers.

Another issue which are kinda bias and a perpetuated stereotype is the fact that the photographer can not be regarded as a professional simply because he earns his living by filming. Everyone can be such a “professional” and benefit from a mediocre level in photos. True, without having a good reputation, the photographer will not be able to succeed. Being professional means understanding what the customer needs, even the most insane and inadequate ones. After all, they’re just people who pay you.

All this is complicated and time was eating. Anyone who has education, a permanent job, and a family, will never agree to constant moving in pursue of career photography laurels because it’s simply incompatible. No worries. You can be a photographer in mind and have a small circle of friends. Or you can take casual photos as a well-paid hobby, and your little passion, without chasing Siberian Tigers or Lady Gaga for a sensational shoot for neither National Geographic nor Cosmopolitan, whatever.